A guide to carbon monoxide...

Carbon monoxide poisoning in the last month: What can I expect to happen?

People respond differently to the same level of carbon monoxide exposure. Because of this, the after effects from carbon monoxide poisoning can range from nothing to severe in people with the same level of exposure.

A person with a relatively low level of poisoning may experience a range of short term symptoms and long term effects caused by carbon monoxide injury. Yet someone with an extreme level of carbon monoxide poisoning may have a full recovery. There is no way to predict the outcome.

Medical doctors, toxicologists, and health professionals are very aware of how carbon monoxide dangers while at unsafe levels in the air and unsafe levels in the body/bloodstream but as a group lack understanding of the impact, subtleties and after effects of poisoning.

For a survivor and their family, the only way to proactively minimize the long term consequences of poisoning is to learn in advance about the potential ongoing effects and become more self aware.

It is generally thought that a person with one-time mild to moderate carbon monoxide poisoning has a strong likelihood of full recovery without ongoing effects however:

  • The accuracy of carbon monoxide statistics are highly questionable.

  • The ongoing impact of mild to moderate poisoning can be subtle yet still have a significant impact on a persons life (without the survivor ever understanding that the poisoning was the turning point that altered the direction of their life).

  • The potential for ongoing symptoms and effects is higher when the level of carbon monoxide exposure is high, extreme, multiple times, or over an extended period of time.

There are high risk factors that increase the likelihood of additional complications, symptoms, and suffering in the short, mid, and long term.

Ongoing effects can show themselves as a range of carbon monoxide related symptoms and have a long term impact. Becoming informed as to what could happen and what to look for is extremely important.

The after effects of carbon monoxide poisoning impact brain functioning making it more difficult for a person to function on a day to day basis. Concentrating, reading, absorbing, memorizing information, and completing tasks may be [much] more difficult.

Some survivors are impacted by the poisoning with a reduced sense of awareness and may have difficulty recognizing or admitting-to behavioral changes - even though the behavioral changes may be clear to others (especially those close to them).

If family and friends make the effort to learn how carbon monoxide poisoning may impact the survivor it can make all the difference. Awareness, understanding, patience, and support from family and friends is extremely valuable.

Your comments about carbon monoxide poisoning...

FacebookTwitterDiggDeliciousRedditStumbleuponYahoo My WebGoogle Bookmarks
Questions? Want to share your opinion? Do it here...
eryn from toronto
I'm with Sheldon, this is a seriously good site!
The house attached to mine caught fire just over two weeks ago, by the time I knew what was happening the smoke was thick in my apartment and I could feel it coating my lungs. Because we got out so quickly we didn't take oxygen from the medics, big mistake.
Since then the symptoms have been bad, lethargy, confusion, severe body aches and pain and confusion. Severe emotions, loss of appetite, etc. I had no idea what was wrong with me and as you indicate, there is no test to be sure, but my doctor suspected that's what happened and this site has answered a LOT of my questions and put my mind at ease tremendously. THANK YOU SO MUCH.

CO2 Poisoning
Teresa from Michigan
I recently suffered CO2 poisoning, my level was a 37 and I was in and out of consciousness, they mentioned taking me to a larger hospital to my husband because of the level. This happend 5 days ago, I am still feeling very fatigued, weak, body aches and very emotional. Is this normal or should I get rechecked?

Exposed twice
LRP from Florida
I have been exposed twice in the past three months to extremely high levels of co2. I will say frankly that both times were related to suicide attempts (there will not be a third).

I can't speak to long term after-effects because the only one I am certain of is a partial loss of vision in both eyes (worse in the left). Other than this, I am a bit "shaky" now when I first start to walk.

I am writing mostly to discourage anyone who thinks that this is a "peaceful" way of ending one's life. It is not. It is not painful but it is not a particularly good way either. On both occasions I ended up having what you could call convulsions and almost epileptic seizures. Maybe there's a part inside of me that didn't want to leave - or maybe it was just involuntary muscle reactions - in either case I stumbled out in a daze and twitchily sat there for close to 2 hours.

Not pleasant.

Help
Jane
I have been so nauseated for over a month with no energy and feeling overly tired all the time if I could have been poisoned by this. I have been to ER 3 times in a month with no results. I finally realized the gas furnace is BADDDDDDD and is being replaced and this is the only thing I can come up with. Everything including water has a sour, bitter, metallic taste to it. Now that the heater is no longer there I am starting to feel better but still have bouts of nausea at times although it is minimal compared to a week ago.

Help
Jane
I have been so nauseated for over a month with no energy and feeling overly tired all the time if I could have been poisoned by this. I have been to ER 3 times in a month with no results. I finally realized the gas furnace is BADDDDDDD and is being replaced and this is the only thing I can come up with. Everything including water has a sour, bitter, metallic taste to it. Now that the heater is no longer there I am starting to feel better but still have bouts of nausea at times although it is minimal compared to a week ago.

Sheldon
Great info. Seriously good site. Thanks!

Questions? Want to share your opinion? Do it here...
FacebookTwitterDiggDeliciousRedditStumbleuponYahoo My WebGoogle Bookmarks

 

Return to If you have had carbon monoxide poisoning or top of Carbon monoxide poison in the last month. What can I expect to happen?




Exposed recently?
Learn more

Join the
recovery support
program

Easy ways you can
make a difference

Audio interviews
with experts

BSF: a natural
option?

Revealing the
invisible iceberg?

CO linked to
common disorders

Carbon Monoxide
Survivor